Ira Sadoff

BY THE MEADOWS OF HAY BALES
April 24, 2016 Sadoff Ira

BY THE MEADOWS OF HAY BALES

 

By the meadows of hay bales

and daffodils, of corn husk and pig shit,

I lived in a forgettable little hamlet

in sincere Ohio. When I wished those scents

 

could take me back to my temple out of town —

the pinewoods of the 19th century —

I forget, in my retreat from the world, I was

already gloomy, choosing the company

 

of insects and voles, friends of the invisible.

There I was spared the satisfactions

of purse and purse string. A good plan

to live by: I survived a tornado, a marriage,

 

and a war, laughing at my local cosmos,

a leveled panorama of stone and clay.

A little heaven with no one near.

Many loved the sheen of cheerfulness

 

but my scalpel and I, we made a face there.

Ira Sadoff’s the author of seven collections of poetry, most recently TRUE FAITH (BOA Editions, 2012) and the re-issued PALM READING IN WINTER (Carnegie-Mellon). He’s published a novel, UNCOUPLING, THE IRA SADOFF READER, and HISTORY MATTERS (U.of Iowa Press) a critical book on poetry and culture. He’s been widely anthologized and awarded grants from the Guggenheim Fellowship and the NEA. He has new work appearing in THE NEW YORKER, APR, and the Academy of American Poets’ Poem a Day Series. He lives in a converted barn in upstate New York.